Social media passwords: a short time off for 24 hours

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) today launched a campaign aimed at encouraging Facebook users to give up social media for 24 hours to support global cyber security and privacy The W3C is the…

Social media passwords: a short time off for 24 hours

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) today launched a campaign aimed at encouraging Facebook users to give up social media for 24 hours to support global cyber security and privacy

The W3C is the non-profit organization that manages the development of the W3C’s Recommendations, Recommendations and Approaches (W3) 3.0. The W3C is leading the effort to centralize the internet’s standards and certifications across multiple domains to better protect its users, whose private information is increasingly being shared by social media platforms.

Although W3C is the leading organization on this issue, a new grassroots project called NotSocial Media on W3C.org is asking Facebook users to make a commitment to leave their phone on silent and Facebook off to support W3C efforts.

They say:

1. Don’t use social media during W3C’s 24-hour Test Drive

When you decide to leave your smartphone on silent and Facebook off for a 24-hour test drive during W3C’s Test Drive, remember to exit your device during that period. If you don’t take this step, you are contributing to the deterioration of the security and privacy of your device.

2. Don’t use social media for 24 hours

Throughout the test drive period, W3C recommends that you consider these guidelines in your daily use of social media:

Adults can share public, inaccurate, inflammatory, and bullying posts anonymously. While you can ban a user for violating W3 standards, you must be aware of the severity of such misuse.

Security threats (such as scams, hackers, and data leaks) by users is rising. W3 standards can no longer be ignored in this way.

Adults are responsible for their own actions that create security risks. The W3 standard cannot be used by sites to account for actions they cannot control.

Adults have a responsibility to monitor information that their children share, if that is of importance to them.

Three weeks ago, Facebook announced a plan to build in security settings for private posts to Facebook users, starting with an experimental feature in iOS, which lets people set who they share with and who has access to private messages.

On 1 March, the W3C released the NotSocial Media Recommendations document with the intention of harnessing the thousands of comments received about NotSocial Media on its respective webpage, where users can share their own insights and thoughts on the mission to better secure the internet.

They say:

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