With the summer travel season just around the corner, new technology will let you check your bags without being swabbed

Passengers with Apple-issued IDs will soon be able to check their bags without being scanned at passport control. Adoption of the new technology will be phased in at eight of the world’s largest airports…

With the summer travel season just around the corner, new technology will let you check your bags without being swabbed

Passengers with Apple-issued IDs will soon be able to check their bags without being scanned at passport control.

Adoption of the new technology will be phased in at eight of the world’s largest airports in stages, beginning at New York’s JFK International Airport.

United Airlines, the carrier that is the largest carrier at JFK, said Thursday that it will apply the new standard for “majority of its travelers” by the fall.

“Passengers will not need to show their passport or any other form of traveler identification when checking bags at the airport check-in area,” United spokeswoman Robin Urbanski said.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials have estimated that the new standard would reduce the need for some travelers to be screened at immigration, but screeners at those airports with legacy scanning equipment will still be able to watch travelers entering the country.

American Airlines spokeswoman Leslie Scott said that the new system would make it “virtually impossible” for screeners to screen passengers using older equipment.

She said that American Airlines will “be equipped with this new technology over the next several months.”

IATA, the trade group for the global aviation industry, will be among those conducting the next set of surveys about the new technology, and the new standard, before a decision is made to fully implement it.

“While the implementation of the new Secure Travel Module by all carriers will make our airports more accessible to the millions of travelers each year, we are concerned that passengers could be inconvenienced by the process,” said Tony Tyler, IATA’s director general and CEO.

“We have written to all airlines requesting that passengers who are traveling to their first or second home should try to check in using their mobile phones and receive their boarding passes online from airlines, even if the passenger’s travels are short,” Tyler said.

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