Activists want Facebook to suspend exec after racist posts

Enlarge Image Facebook Activists are asking Facebook to suspend an executive who allowed anti-Muslim content on the social network. The New York Times reports that Hindu activists in India have been very vocal about…

Activists want Facebook to suspend exec after racist posts

Enlarge Image Facebook

Activists are asking Facebook to suspend an executive who allowed anti-Muslim content on the social network.

The New York Times reports that Hindu activists in India have been very vocal about Facebook’s reaction to banning a group from the country. According to activists, Facebook was lenient in its treatment of the group, which allowed anti-Muslim rhetoric to spread.

Many within Facebook and Google are trying to prevent dangerous information from disseminating. They’re doing it with the filters they set, the algorithms they produce and the actions they take. So far, Facebook hasn’t stepped in to completely shut down an account it took down for containing racist content.

Twitter, too, has gotten into the act. Earlier this month, the company announced it would be reducing the duration of tweets containing hate speech to 2.8 seconds. It also said that it would begin to index terrorist propaganda.

Facebook, however, has responded to anti-Muslim hate speech in its social network very slowly. It was silent when a hate group called “Sagarik Jana Gana Mana” (Blessed Lord) appealed its censorship in a Delhi court. In the days after the judgement was passed, anti-Muslim slogans were found on the group’s Facebook page.

Then, when a teacher complained about the posts she said she’d seen, Facebook’s lawyers in India appeased her by saying it would remove posts containing hate speech. In the days that followed, however, Facebook left some images still visible on the page.

The Hindu’s Shubhendu Sethi and Hindu Samaj’s Satyavrat Seksaria are now seeking Facebook’s help to shut down the group. They also urged the government to crack down on hate speech, saying Indian education policies in particular need to do more to promote tolerance.

Though many aspects of India’s education system are secular, it’s predominantly a Hindu nation.

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