Police took too long to inform family of dead taxi driver, London’s mayor says

London Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick on Tuesday responded to a widespread public outcry over how she and her colleagues handled the case of a security guard found dead in a taxi in Pimlico….

Police took too long to inform family of dead taxi driver, London’s mayor says

London Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick on Tuesday responded to a widespread public outcry over how she and her colleagues handled the case of a security guard found dead in a taxi in Pimlico.

The police, in a statement, said “significant lines of inquiry” had been exhausted and did not specifically address whether any officers were disciplined in the wake of the discovery of 40-year-old guard who was likely drugged and strangled.

“Whilst the investigation continues, we are providing support to the family of Mark Everard and reminding the public of the importance of reporting suspicious deaths,” the police said in their statement.

On Tuesday, Dick apologized to Everard’s family for how she and her colleagues handled the case, insisting it was the right decision to appeal for tips from the public on how the guard was found dead inside his taxi. That move almost doubled the number of police representatives in the area, she said.

The British capital has repeatedly come under fire for its handling of cases including the serial killer of 13 women and two teenage girls, the conviction of several men in the 2011 murder of 18-year-old British model Sian O’Callaghan and the 2012 murder of yet another teenager, Kate Sheedy.

The apparently careless approach by the Met Police to many of those crimes was documented by the London Evening Standard, which recently released a video of senior officers drinking free tumblers of coffee with Katie Hopkins, a columnist for Breitbart and member of Parliament, and David Videcette, a former senior detective who had fallen out with the police over his case.

The investigation into the deaths of the two teenagers in 2012 outraged Britons and paved the way for the arrest of 17-year-old Connor Stevens, a teenage lacrosse player, who admitted killing them and was found guilty of two counts of murder and two counts of conspiracy to murder. He is being sentenced later this week.

Despite the advances in the detection of serial killers, it is rare for London Police to hold any officers accountable, according to the Standard. A dozen policemen have been charged with negligent homicide. None were convicted.

Everard’s family earlier told the media that they would be filing a wrongful death claim against the Met. The car was reportedly hired in order to find a buyer for a West Bank truck in which Everard’s client had placed some of his belongings.

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