Joe Biden is now in Bernie Sanders’ corner, so what happens now?

Joining the chorus of just about all leading national liberal figures, Vice President Joe Biden yesterday said that he was siding with the Democratic presidential nomination front-runner, Senator Bernie Sanders, even though Sanders had…

Joe Biden is now in Bernie Sanders' corner, so what happens now?

Joining the chorus of just about all leading national liberal figures, Vice President Joe Biden yesterday said that he was siding with the Democratic presidential nomination front-runner, Senator Bernie Sanders, even though Sanders had shunned him in the past. But, warns GOP strategist Alex Castellanos, in a syndicated column in USA Today today, “Biden’s switch is playing into the hands of the right.”

“He is running against Clinton even though they are always together, because the truth is, he’s too liberal. Biden won’t get the blue-collar working folks of the Midwest or the bluest part of the northeast on his side — never mind anywhere else. He’s becoming a repository for anti-Clinton sentiment in the Democratic Party.”

No challenger, concludes Castellanos, has “many options but run as a Democrat.”

Commenting on Biden’s switch in newspaper coverage on the Fox News website, national pundit John Podhoretz wrote this morning that “Mr. Biden is given to dropping bombshells, and in his interview with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes he insisted that he will run for president even though he hadn’t announced his intention to do so. And it is entirely possible that he’s jumping into the race just to spoil Donald Trump’s good time.”

Other watchers were less sure that both a Sanders-Biden match-up and a Trump-Biden race would lose to Clinton. “Certainly Trump could draw new voters to the Republican Party than Hillary, but he’s got a lot more to offer them than just anger,” says Democrat and presidential scholar Steve Hess. “A lot of his base is white working class and unionized so he’d probably run into the same kind of shortfalls among that group as John Edwards has. But his jobs policies could appeal to those people too and much of his campaign is geared to populist issues. His support would be broad but not deep.”

Former Senate majority leader Tom Daschle, meanwhile, told POLITICO this morning that “with Sanders pulling ahead and Biden (a junior senator) getting in, you have to believe there’s a 17-7 of support for Clinton.”

In other news, Mike Huckabee, a GOP contender from 2012, told the The New York Times that “we shouldn’t think of the Republican presidential nomination as an extremely serious issue” and that Huckabee himself “would probably run, but not for the highest office in the land.”

On the Huffington Post site, another Fox News expert, Rick Barnes, responded, “If Mike Huckabee is looking for a governor, Alabama’s Robert Bentley may be a more attractive prospect.” And if McCain “is looking for a Senator from the Deep South, Rand Paul has the potential to win four of the five states in the ‘March 13th Super Tuesday’ caucuses.”

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