Kilauea volcano explodes as Hawaii swells with tourists

This article was updated on October 17, 2018, at 1:20 p.m. PDT. Lava fountains rose from hot spots near the summit of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano on Tuesday, November 13, nearly two weeks after the…

Kilauea volcano explodes as Hawaii swells with tourists

This article was updated on October 17, 2018, at 1:20 p.m. PDT.

Lava fountains rose from hot spots near the summit of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano on Tuesday, November 13, nearly two weeks after the volcano first erupted from the ground and spewed a huge plume of smoke into the sky.

The US Geological Survey measured the volcanic activity at 2,769 degrees Fahrenheit, which the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said was the highest since 2011.

The volcano is belching sulfur dioxide, which is a fine-grained yellow gas with pungent sulfuric odors, as it vents magma from the ground. American Red Cross shelters have had to deal with a growing number of guests — Hawaiians and other tourists alike — wanting to escape the lava glow.

“The scenes of lava erupting and now the explosions over the last few days have been incredible, and it has meant that hotels are filling up quickly,” Kilauea visitor Dana Murray told US News. “It’s almost like Hawaii has turned into something out of ‘Men in Black’ with the lava. It’s amazing to watch it happen.”

Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano erupts

Kilauea is a major volcano located near Hawaii’s Big Island, which has been rocked by volcanic activity since May. Within a day of the eruptions, molten rock was shown flowing out of fissures along the volcano’s eastern flank.

In the first few weeks of the eruption, eruptions continued until nearly a month later, when the lava and gas subsided. But as of last week, researchers have been experiencing a “new geological eruption,” adding significantly to Hawaii’s lava flow.

Leave a Comment