Yale confirms fake map of Fort Dix was hoax

Image copyright Yale University Image caption Other schools have updated their Vinland maps, including Columbia The Yale University map of Fort Dix, in New Jersey, says the map was drawn in the 14th century,…

Yale confirms fake map of Fort Dix was hoax

Image copyright Yale University Image caption Other schools have updated their Vinland maps, including Columbia

The Yale University map of Fort Dix, in New Jersey, says the map was drawn in the 14th century, but it is a hoax, the school has confirmed.

The annual map of America, which has been recognised by the Library of Congress since the 1950s, shows how Venice was mapped in the mid-14th century.

An academic “recall”, as it is called, led to the map’s demise, Yale said.

Wikimedia Foundation said the university “aided” the hoax.

The map had been in the library for centuries, but after the university’s “recall” the map was taken out of its place at the Yale Librarian’s Office and it was re-titled a map of Eurasia.

Yale said an art historian at the university had suggested in September that the map could not be authentic.

But Yale said in a statement: “Because of course, no one is going to take such an investigation seriously without a ‘review’ by the Yale Librarian’s office.”

The statement added that this had been brought to the attention of the Yale University Library’s book committee.

The map went back on display at the museum in Yale University in July.

Some other schools have made changes to their own maps of Vinland, including Columbia University, which gave its version a completely different name, The Beacon, and rearranged it.

Columbia said it had replaced it with a different map and recently decided to explore alternative options.

The tradition of coming up with fake maps of Vinland dates back to the 14th century, say reports.

According to the Yale Journal of Art History, the tradition began in 1577, when John Smith, who was apparently the founder of Yale, claimed he drew the map.

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