iOS 15: 7 ways to start fitting health into your life

The much-hyped iOS 15 is closer than ever before, even in the wilds of macOS Sierra. Apple has begun enabling users to download and install an array of new features for iPhone and iPad,…

iOS 15: 7 ways to start fitting health into your life

The much-hyped iOS 15 is closer than ever before, even in the wilds of macOS Sierra. Apple has begun enabling users to download and install an array of new features for iPhone and iPad, including some long-awaited but also some lesser-known goodies.

The most interesting of the not-so-little goodies are the changes to the Health app on both iPhone and iPad, which lets you keep track of your exercise and health stats from the palm of your hand.

Here’s a quick rundown of what you get with Health in iOS 15, with some initial praise from our Apple-watcher at TiPb.

There are a few basics included with Health, but what isn’t clear at first glance is the extent to which you can customize it. Its icons and basic functions are universally empathetic to the needs of any human being, but you can change everything from its layout to its layout on a per-app basis. For example, you can switch between old and new file formats, you can scroll vertically across Health’s interface, and you can always select multiple, smaller photos and keep them in tabs below the main view.

Personalization is your main conduit for Activity progress too. Changes are specific to your iPhone or iPad, but by clicking “Use Health to control the Activity on an iPhone or iPad” you can link to and modify your Activity tracker on the web. From there, you can also modify your Nike+ running pace. Other apps will automatically improve with Health, including Spotify.

Then there’s Personal Records, which simplifies all sorts of record-keeping. When you sign in to your Health account, you’ll be able to see all your CarePass or McKesson Records. You can ask your physician to review your record, and also manually let them view it.

Apple Health figures to be part of your daily routine, though it’s possible you’ll find yourself using it only a few times a year. The size of the repository is bound to balloon at some point, though, so that it can be easily shared among friends.

The app is incredibly slick. You’ll use your front-facing camera to measure your blood oxygen levels, take step counts, count calories, and so on. The visual nature is aimed squarely at consumers, though anyone who is serious about health can do better—they can just add their own measurements, such as a whole-body measurement using ultrasound.

It’s incredibly useful, and it’s useful to have it on your iPhone. When developers start creating compatible apps, those will multiply and multiply, becoming an extra source of data for people with no thought whatsoever about their own health.

It will be interesting to see if Health evolves to expand beyond just tracking real-world health data. We certainly expect it to at some point.

READ: What’s new in iOS 12?

This article originally appeared on TiPb.

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